Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

Ashmolean − Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

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The emperor Bahadur Shah

  • loan
  • Description

    Europeanised in its full-face portraiture and modelling, this sadly gazing nobleman is the last Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah II (r.1837-1858). Like his father, seen in the previous painting [LI118.33], he ruled India in name only, and his domains hardly reached beyond the Red Fort. Already an old man when he came to the throne, he had spent much of his life in the pursuit of Urdu poetry. For his nominal leadership of the Indian Rebellion of 1857, he was deposed by the British and died in exile.

  • Details

    Associated place
    AsiaIndianorth IndiaNational Capital Territory of Delhi Delhi (place of creation)
    Date
    1855 - 1858
    Mughal Period (1526 - 1858)
    Associated people
    Bahadur Shah II (ruled 1837 - 1858) (subject)
    Material and technique
    gouache on paper
    Dimensions
    frame 49.7 x 37.2 x 2.5 cm (height x width x depth)
    painting 36 x 24 cm (height x width)
    Material index
    Technique index
    Object type index
    No. of items
    1
    Credit line
    Lent by Howard Hodgkin.
    Accession no.
    LI118.111
  • Further reading

    Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 2nd February-22nd April 2012, Visions of Mughal India: The Collection of Howard Hodgkin, Andrew Topsfield, ed. (Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 2012), no. 34 on p. 88, p. 86, illus. p. 89

Past Exhibition

see (1)

Location

    • currently in research collection

Objects are sometimes moved to a different location. Our object location data is usually updated on a monthly basis. Contact the Jameel Study Centre if you are planning to visit the museum to see a particular object on display, or would like to arrange an appointment to see an object in our reserve collections.

 

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