Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

Ashmolean − Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

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  • loan
  • Description

    An Lin (born 1930) was born in Chengdu, Sichuan province. She studied painting in the Sichuan Art Academy and is a member of the Chinese Artists’ Association. She specialises in shuiyin print and is famous for her lively depictions of birds and animals. This print was a gift of the artist to Michael Sullivan (1916-2013) in 1980 when Michael was visiting China. The inscription reads ‘For Mr. Sullivan and Wu Huan as a memento.’

  • Details

    Associated place
    AsiaChinaSichuan province Chengdu (place of creation)
    Date
    August 1980
    Artist/maker
    An Lin (born 1930) (printmaker)
    Associated people
    Khoan Sullivan (1919 - 2003) (recipient)
    Michael Sullivan (1916 - 2013) (recipient)
    Material and technique
    shuiyin
    Dimensions
    frame 72.2 x 54.6 x 2.5 cm (height x width x depth)
    print 27.8 x 32.5 cm sight size (height x width)
    Material index
    Technique index
    Object type index
    No. of items
    1
    Credit line
    On loan from the Khoan and Michael Sullivan Collection.
    Accession no.
    LI2022.423
  • Further reading

    Sullivan, Michael, Modern Chinese Art: The Khoan and Michael Sullivan Collection, revised edn (Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 2009), no. 72 on p. 274, illus. p.274 fig. 72

Glossary

shuiyin

  • shuiyin

    Shuiyin is a water-soluble ink printed woodcut.

Past Exhibition

see (1)

Location

    • currently in research collection

Objects are sometimes moved to a different location. Our object location data is usually updated on a monthly basis. Contact the Jameel Study Centre if you are planning to visit the museum to see a particular object on display, or would like to arrange an appointment to see an object in our reserve collections.

 

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