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Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

Ashmolean − Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

Kuniyoshi’s Heroes of China and Japan

A catalogue of the Ashmolean’s collection of warriors by Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861) by Oliver Impey and Mitsuko Watanabe (published Oxford, 2003).

Kuniyoshi’s Heroes of China and Japan by Oliver Impey and Mitsuko Watanabe

Publications online: 20 objects

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The warrior Harunaga-kō tearing a tent bearing his vassal's crest

Location

    • currently in research collection

Objects are sometimes moved to a different location. Our object location data is usually updated on a monthly basis. Contact the Jameel Study Centre if you are planning to visit the museum to see a particular object on display, or would like to arrange an appointment to see an object in our reserve collections.

 

Publications online

  • Kuniyoshi’s Heroes of China and Japan by Oliver Impey and Mitsuko Watanabe

    Kuniyoshi’s Heroes of China and Japan

    Oda Nobunaga, 1534-1582, (here disguised under the name of Harunaga-kō) was a descendant of Taira no Kiyomori. He was the first of the three great unifiers of Japan at the end of the civil wars of the Sengoku-jidai, 1467-1568, defeating many key figures during the period and conquering several domains. In 1582 he ordered Akechi Mitsuhide, 1528?-1582, (here Takechi Michihide), one of his vassals, to provide entertainment for a great welcoming party for Tokugawa leyasu (1542-1616). Mitsuhide organised it most sumptuously, displaying treasures of gold and silver; however, Nobunaga became very angry when Mitsuhide used a tent curtain marked with his own crest.

    In this print 'Harunaga-kō' is in court robes, wearing a tachi sword, tearing the tent curtain containing 'Takechi's' crest, in anger. Mitsuhide later turned against Nobunaga, who he caused to commit suicide at the Honnō-ji incident of the same year, when he burned down Azuchi castle.
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Object information may not accurately reflect the actual contents of the original publication, since our online objects contain current information held in our collections database. Click on 'buy this publication' to purchase printed versions of our online publications, where available, or contact the Jameel Study Centre to arrange access to books on our collections that are now out of print.

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