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Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

Ashmolean − Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

Kuniyoshi’s Heroes of China and Japan

A catalogue of the Ashmolean’s collection of warriors by Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861) by Oliver Impey and Mitsuko Watanabe (published Oxford, 2003).

Kuniyoshi’s Heroes of China and Japan by Oliver Impey and Mitsuko Watanabe

Publications online: 20 objects

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The warrior Sasai Kyūzō Masayasu at the battle of Anegawa

Location

    • currently in research collection

Objects are sometimes moved to a different location. Our object location data is usually updated on a monthly basis. Contact the Jameel Study Centre if you are planning to visit the museum to see a particular object on display, or would like to arrange an appointment to see an object in our reserve collections.

 

Publications online

  • Kuniyoshi’s Heroes of China and Japan by Oliver Impey and Mitsuko Watanabe

    Kuniyoshi’s Heroes of China and Japan

    Sakai Kyūzō, 1555-1570, (here Sasai Kyūzō Masayasu) was Masanao's oldest son (see No.14) [EA1971.60]. When he was thirteen years old, he had taken part in his first battle, killing Tatebe Genhachirō, one of the powerful soldiers of the time. Kyūzō subsequently became one of the Nobunaga's favourite pages. In 1570, Kyūzō at the age of 15, went with his father Masanao to the battle of Anegawa, fought between Oda Nobunaga and Asai Nagamasa. Although Masanao withdrew from the battle, being unable to protect his camp against Asai's attack, Kyūzō fought desperately without retreating. Eventually, he was killed by gunfire as he tried to break into the camp of Nagamasa.

    This print shows 'Masayasu', enveloped in smoke, mowed down by a volley of musket-fire at the battle of Anegawa.
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Object information may not accurately reflect the actual contents of the original publication, since our online objects contain current information held in our collections database. Click on 'buy this publication' to purchase printed versions of our online publications, where available, or contact the Jameel Study Centre to arrange access to books on our collections that are now out of print.

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